New USGA Golf Museum Exhibit Celebrates Pioneers in Women’s Golf

“Breaking New Ground: Women and Golf Course Architecture” is now open at the USGA Museum, located in Far Hills, NJ.

Since the late 1800s, a small but influential group of women have carved a space of their own in golf, using the one tool that most influences a player’s experience: the golf course. The USGA Golf Museum’s new exhibit, “Breaking New Ground: Women and Golf Course Architecture,” explores this rarely discussed segment of golf history and recounts unique narratives of female leadership, initiative and innovation.

Artifacts from the museum collection, in addition to loans from the United Kingdom and local historical archives, illustrate how women have influenced golf course design theory and played a role in creating more equitable and enjoyable experiences for all who play the game.

“These incredible women not only shaped the dialogue surrounding how courses could be more welcoming to other women – they also inspired new generations to build careers and opportunities in golf,” said Diana Murphy, president of the USGA. “We all have something to learn from their ingenuity and passion for the game, and the USGA couldn’t be prouder to showcase their contributions.”

“Breaking New Ground” tells the stories of several early women’s golf clubs, such as the St. Andrews Ladies’ Golf Club (1867), Carnoustie Ladies Golf Club (1873) and Morris County Golf Club (1894).  The exhibit also features artifacts from women who pioneered the male-dominated golf course architecture field. Modern-day architects Alice Dye and Jan Bel Jan, along with industry movers-and-shakers Arthur Little and Jan Leeming, bring “Breaking New Ground” into the present and future, as the exhibit displays videos highlighting their work to increase playability and accessibility through course design and set up.

The exhibit will be on display at the USGA Golf Museum through December 2018.  The museum is open to the public from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., Tuesday through Sunday. Entry is $10 for adults and $5 for USGA Members; kids 12 and under enter free, and includes access to the Hall of Champions, as well as rooms dedicated to Arnold Palmer, Jack Nicklaus, Ben Hogan and Mickey Wright. Ticket holders for the 2017 U.S. Women’s Open Championship enter free until the end of the year.

For more information on the USGA Museum, click here.